Riot grrrl (zine)

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'''riot grrrl''' was a free mini [[zine]] released by members of the band Bratmobile, [[Allison Wolfe]] and [[Molly Neuman]]. who were also the editors of [[Girl Germs]].
'''riot grrrl''' was a free mini [[zine]] released by members of the band Bratmobile, [[Allison Wolfe]] and [[Molly Neuman]]. who were also the editors of [[Girl Germs]].
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'''riot grrrl''' was published in the early 1990's in Washington D.C. and, later, Olympia, WA. For a time it was a weekly publication. The zine covered the events happening in the scene surrounding Bratmobile and the band Bikini Kill, whose members [[Kathleen Hanna]] and [[Tobi Vail]] also regularly contributed but, as well, covered bands like Nation of Ulysses. Other contributors included Tabitha. It also contained information about the early Riot Grrrl meetings that were first held in D.C., and about the ideas that these women were formulating that would soon result in a wide spread movement; short pieces, sometimes essays, some intensely personal, and others manifestos; feminist critiques of the punk scene and womens' place in society in general, that would come to represent the emerging [[Riot Grrrl]] movement. Many of the articles were printed anonymously and the zine was done in a [[Cut and Paste|cut and paste]] [[punk]] style. Each cover featured a comic character or photo of an iconic woman. The editors encouraged other girls to copy and recopy the zine and pass it along freely.
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'''riot grrrl''' was published in the early 1990's in Washington D.C. and, later, Olympia, WA. For a time it was a weekly publication. The zine covered the events happening in the scene surrounding Bratmobile and the band Bikini Kill, whose members [[Kathleen Hanna]] and [[Tobi Vail]] also regularly contributed but, as well, covered bands like Nation of Ulysses. Other contributors included Tabitha. It also contained information about the early Riot Grrrl meetings that were first held in D.C., and about the ideas that these women were formulating that would soon result in a wide spread movement; short pieces, sometimes essays, some intensely personal, and others manifestos; feminist critiques of the punk scene and womens' place in society in general, that would come to represent the emerging [[Riot Grrrl]] movement. Many of the articles were printed anonymously and the zine was done in a [[Cut and Paste|cut and paste]] [[punk]] style. Each cover featured a comic character or photo of an iconic woman. The editors encouraged other girls to copy and recopy the zine and pass it along freely. Many zines subsequently used the title ''riot grrrl'' once the original zine editors had long since ceased publishing.
It is undoubtably this zine which popularized the term "Riot Grrrl" that came to be attached to the movement these women began.
It is undoubtably this zine which popularized the term "Riot Grrrl" that came to be attached to the movement these women began.

Revision as of 08:22, 7 April 2007

riot grrrl was a free mini zine released by members of the band Bratmobile, Allison Wolfe and Molly Neuman. who were also the editors of Girl Germs.

riot grrrl was published in the early 1990's in Washington D.C. and, later, Olympia, WA. For a time it was a weekly publication. The zine covered the events happening in the scene surrounding Bratmobile and the band Bikini Kill, whose members Kathleen Hanna and Tobi Vail also regularly contributed but, as well, covered bands like Nation of Ulysses. Other contributors included Tabitha. It also contained information about the early Riot Grrrl meetings that were first held in D.C., and about the ideas that these women were formulating that would soon result in a wide spread movement; short pieces, sometimes essays, some intensely personal, and others manifestos; feminist critiques of the punk scene and womens' place in society in general, that would come to represent the emerging Riot Grrrl movement. Many of the articles were printed anonymously and the zine was done in a cut and paste punk style. Each cover featured a comic character or photo of an iconic woman. The editors encouraged other girls to copy and recopy the zine and pass it along freely. Many zines subsequently used the title riot grrrl once the original zine editors had long since ceased publishing.

It is undoubtably this zine which popularized the term "Riot Grrrl" that came to be attached to the movement these women began.

See also

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