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[[Image:Dishwasherpete.jpg|thumb|125px|Dishwasher Pete]] '''[[Dishwasher Pete]]''' is the pen name for Pete Jordan, the writer and publisher of the now defunct [[Dishwasher]] [[perzine]]. He's also the author of the book ''DISHWASHER: One Man's Quest to Wash Dishes in All Fifty States'' that was published May 1st, 2007 by Harper.  
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[[Image:punk-planet.jpg|thumb|125px|Punk Planet]] '''''[[Punk Planet]]''''' was a 16,000 print run [[punk]] [[zine]], based in [[Chicago]], IL, that focused most of its energy on looking at punk subculture. In addition to covering music, ''Punk Planet'' also covered visual arts and a wide variety of progressive issues -- including media criticism, feminism, and labor issues.  The most notable features in ''Punk Planet'' were the interviews and the album and zine reviews.  The interviews generally ran two or three pages, and focused on the motivations of the artist (or organizer, activist, or whoever) being interviewed.
  
For twelve years Pete moved from state to state with the goal of washing dishes in all 50 states of the US and writing about it. When Dishwasher Pete's story reached the mainstream, he was invited to appear on ''Late Night with David Letterman''. As a joke he sent an imposter in his place who Letterman believed to be Pete, making for one of the more infamous moments in zining. The story was retold in issue #12 of Dishwasher.  
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The first issue was published in May of 1994 and was created in part as a response to the perception that ''[[Maximum Rock and Roll]]'' was becoming too elitist.
  
Pete has also contributed to the NPR radio show ''This American Life''.
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On June 18, 2007, an email was sent out to subscribers 30 minutes before [http://www.punkplanet.com/pp_blog/punk_planet_magazine_r_i_p_p a post at punkplanet.com] informed the public that after 13 years and 80 issues, Punk Planet's final issue was being sent out. The reasoning pointed to "bad distribution deals, disappearing advertisers, and a decreasing audience of subscribers".
  
'''[[Dishwasher Pete|Read More...]]'''
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A few hours later, [[Alan Lastufka]] made a video eulogy, dedicated to Punk Planet co-editors Dan Sinker and Anne Elizabeth Moore. The video featured Alan, [[Dan Halligan]], Mack (KungFuFlipperBaby on the PP forums), Kevin (KPunk on the PP forums) and [[M. Brianna Stallings]]. The video can be [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hz6oOkdm2FU watched on YouTube].
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'''[[Punk Planet|Read More...]]'''
 
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Revision as of 09:02, 21 June 2007

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This Month's Featured Article!

Punk Planet
Punk Planet was a 16,000 print run punk zine, based in Chicago, IL, that focused most of its energy on looking at punk subculture. In addition to covering music, Punk Planet also covered visual arts and a wide variety of progressive issues -- including media criticism, feminism, and labor issues. The most notable features in Punk Planet were the interviews and the album and zine reviews. The interviews generally ran two or three pages, and focused on the motivations of the artist (or organizer, activist, or whoever) being interviewed.

The first issue was published in May of 1994 and was created in part as a response to the perception that Maximum Rock and Roll was becoming too elitist.

On June 18, 2007, an email was sent out to subscribers 30 minutes before a post at punkplanet.com informed the public that after 13 years and 80 issues, Punk Planet's final issue was being sent out. The reasoning pointed to "bad distribution deals, disappearing advertisers, and a decreasing audience of subscribers".

A few hours later, Alan Lastufka made a video eulogy, dedicated to Punk Planet co-editors Dan Sinker and Anne Elizabeth Moore. The video featured Alan, Dan Halligan, Mack (KungFuFlipperBaby on the PP forums), Kevin (KPunk on the PP forums) and M. Brianna Stallings. The video can be watched on YouTube.

Read More...

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