Difference between revisions of "Incoherent House"

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Incoherent House was a personal and music zine put out by Mitzi Waltz with contributions from various friends in San Francisco. It carried show reviews, band and artist interviews, personal essays, and photos. Several artists' work was featured in it, including Teri Corbin, Dave Duran, Bill Gridley and Grux.
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Incoherent House was a personal and music zine put out by Mitzi Waltz from 1985 to 1989, with contributions from various friends, in San Francisco. It carried show reviews, band and artist interviews, personal essays, and photos. Several artists' work was featured in it, including Teri Corbin, R.K. Sloane, Greg Kulz, Dave Duran, Bill Gridley and Grux.
  
 
Bands interviewed ranged from TSOL to Helios Creed.
 
Bands interviewed ranged from TSOL to Helios Creed.
  
 
The first issue had one-off covers made from metallic paper scraps glued onto a folded cut and paste format zine. Later issues mixed cut and paste and columns printed out via a portable electric typewriter, and were stitched together on the left side with yarn.
 
The first issue had one-off covers made from metallic paper scraps glued onto a folded cut and paste format zine. Later issues mixed cut and paste and columns printed out via a portable electric typewriter, and were stitched together on the left side with yarn.

Revision as of 13:21, 13 December 2009

IH4 cover0001.jpg

Incoherent House was a personal and music zine put out by Mitzi Waltz from 1985 to 1989, with contributions from various friends, in San Francisco. It carried show reviews, band and artist interviews, personal essays, and photos. Several artists' work was featured in it, including Teri Corbin, R.K. Sloane, Greg Kulz, Dave Duran, Bill Gridley and Grux.

Bands interviewed ranged from TSOL to Helios Creed.

The first issue had one-off covers made from metallic paper scraps glued onto a folded cut and paste format zine. Later issues mixed cut and paste and columns printed out via a portable electric typewriter, and were stitched together on the left side with yarn.