Difference between revisions of "Eerie Country"

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In the 1950s, Ganley had published the science fiction fanzine [[Fan-Fare (U.S.A.)|Fan-Fare]]. He returned to publishing in the 1970s with the release of ''Eerie Country'', devoted to weird fiction, suspense and horror stories and poetry.
 
In the 1950s, Ganley had published the science fiction fanzine [[Fan-Fare (U.S.A.)|Fan-Fare]]. He returned to publishing in the 1970s with the release of ''Eerie Country'', devoted to weird fiction, suspense and horror stories and poetry.
  
Artwork was by Todd Klein, Allen Koszowski, J. K. Potter, Jim Pianfetti, and others  
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Artwork was by Todd Klein, Allen Koszowski, J. K. Potter, Jim Pianfetti, and others.
  
Poetry came from  Bernadette Bosky, Joseph Payne Brennan ([[Macabre (U.S.A.)|Macabre]]), Robert E, Briney, Steve Eng, and others.  
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Poetry came from  Bernadette Bosky, Joseph Payne Brennan ([[Macabre (U.S.A.)|Macabre]]), Robert E, Briney, Steve Eng, Joey Froehlich, William Scott Home, Steve Troyanovich, and others.  
  
 
Fiction was by Branley Allan Branson, Earnest Johnson, Ray Jones, Raymond Kaminski, and Ruth M. Walsh.  
 
Fiction was by Branley Allan Branson, Earnest Johnson, Ray Jones, Raymond Kaminski, and Ruth M. Walsh.  

Revision as of 22:37, 20 August 2011

Eerie Country is a horror and weird fiction fanzine by W. Paul Ganley.

In the 1950s, Ganley had published the science fiction fanzine Fan-Fare. He returned to publishing in the 1970s with the release of Eerie Country, devoted to weird fiction, suspense and horror stories and poetry.

Artwork was by Todd Klein, Allen Koszowski, J. K. Potter, Jim Pianfetti, and others.

Poetry came from Bernadette Bosky, Joseph Payne Brennan (Macabre), Robert E, Briney, Steve Eng, Joey Froehlich, William Scott Home, Steve Troyanovich, and others.

Fiction was by Branley Allan Branson, Earnest Johnson, Ray Jones, Raymond Kaminski, and Ruth M. Walsh.